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Guide to the Declaration

The Guide provides supplimentary information about important questions raised by the Declaration, including:
  • What Makes the Declaration Unique?
  • What Is Equality?
  • What is the Basis for the Theory of the Declaration?

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He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing Importance, unless suspended in their Operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

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This refers to the policy of requiring the colonial governors or chief executives within each colony to suspend certain kinds of laws passed by the Colonial assemblies until the King should give his assent to them. Sometimes these laws would be neglected by the King for years. Jefferson wrote in his "Summary View of the Rights of British America" (1774): "With equal inattention to the necessities of his people here has his majesty permitted our laws to lie neglected in England for years, neither confirming them by his assent, nor annulling them by his negative."

Founders' Writings

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John Adams
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