Founding.com: A Project of the Claremont Institute

Guide to the Declaration

The Guide provides supplimentary information about important questions raised by the Declaration, including:
  • What Makes the Declaration Unique?
  • What Is Equality?
  • What is the Basis for the Theory of the Declaration?

Search the Site

 

Home »  The Declaration »

For transporting us beyond the Seas to be tried for pretended Offenses:

Print This

British policy allowed Americans to be transported to England at the desire of either prosecutor or defendant in trials of persons charged with having committed murder in the course of suppressing a riot or enforcing revenue laws. Americans charged with crime subject to trial in the military courts could also be transported far from the scene of the actual crime to stand trial. And, Americans could also themselves be shipped to England to stand trial for certain crimes against the King's property, for example His Majesty's ships or other military equipment. This policy was so obnoxious to the Americans that the first Continental Congress on October 21, 1774, adopted a resolution declaring "That the seizing, or attempting to seize, any person in America, in order to transport such person beyond the sea, for trial of offenses, committed within the body of a county in America, being against law, will justify, and ought to meet with resistance and reprisal."

Founders' Writings

Find out more from the Founders themselves with our online collection of important works from:

John Adams
Benjamin Franklin
Alexander Hamilton
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
George Washington
James Wilson